Is time-out an appropriate discipline technique?

Posted by Care Courses

Jul 20, 2018 9:09:25 AM

Many adults see time-out as a valuable non-violent method of disciplining misbehaving children. Although this is a common view, it is a misguided one.

Time-out can foster hostility, resentment, and even defiance in a child. Children’s behavior that adults consider “bad” is really evidence of some problem the child is experiencing. Instead of banishing the child to time-out, adults should look for the reasons behind children’s inappropriate behavior and use positive strategies to remedy problems.

Early childhood specialist Dr. Maxine Edwards Cornwell has the following to say about time-out:

Many caregivers use the time-out chair today as a non-violent method of disciplining misbehaving children. It has replaced the dunce cap in the corner and the nose in the circle on the blackboard as a generally accepted way of getting children to think about their behavior.

The fact is that the time-out chair is effective in buying some quiet time for a caregiver. That’s about all it does positively. Negatively, it makes children acutely aware of who the “bad kids” are (they’re always in The Chair). Children do not sit there and think about what they did or what they should have or should not have done. If they think about themselves at all, it’s with an “I’m bad; they don’t like me and I don’t like them either so there” attitude.

A better choice is removal from the scene of the battle to spend a few minutes with a caregiver who can lovingly discuss the problem with the child. This does not isolate children or label them “bad” but serves a better purpose—teaching children to get along with each other. We do not learn to get along with each other in the time-out chair.

If you have used time-out as a method of discipline, consider how effective this strategy has been. How often is the same child sent to time-out? Has time-out boosted children’s self-esteem? Made children more cooperative? Resulted in positive changes in children’s behavior? Chances are your answers to these questions do not support the continued use of this technique.

If you ever feel absolutely compelled to send a child to time-out, consider this a red flag. Find positive ways to help this child so that you will never have to resort to using time-out a second time for this child.

Please let us know how we can be of additional assistance! Call us: 1-800-685-7610, Monday through Friday, 9–5 ET, or email us days, evenings, and weekends: info@CareCourses.com. We’re here to help!

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Does my Care Course have an expiration date?

Posted by Care Courses

May 22, 2018 5:12:16 PM

Care Courses is dedicated to providing you with the most up-to-date information based on new research findings, licensing regulations, and safety protocols. As a caregiver, you need to be equipped with current knowledge and use best practices when working with young children. That’s why we are constantly updating our courses and why we now have a 24-month expiration date for our enrollment codes.

This policy was instituted on January 1, 2018. The enrollment code for any course purchased before this date will expire on January 1, 2020. The enrollment code for any course purchased on or after January 1, 2018 will expire 2 years after the purchase date.

Our distance-learning courses are designed to allow you the freedom to work at your own pace. You should feel no pressure completing a course before the enrollment code expires. The good news is that more than 99% of our students complete a course within this time period!

Please let us know how we can be of additional assistance! Call us: 1-800-685-7610, Monday through Friday, 9–5 ET, or email us days, evenings and weekends: info@CareCourses.com. We’re here to help!

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What are some activities to promote integration and cooperation in child care?

Posted by Care Courses

Jun 27, 2016 9:03:34 AM

 

Many caregivers often wonder how children need guidance to learn how to travel outside their familiar circles to get to know others from different backgrounds.  At Care Courses we offer a course called Everyone Welcome!, which can help early childhood professionals understand how to incorporate children from varying ethnic groups.  It can also teach child care providers how to provide services and opportunities to members of all groups equally.

Integration has three main advantages. First, everyone has opportunities to participate in what the bigger group is doing. Second, pooling everyone’s resources gives the entire group a competitive advantage in getting things accomplished. Third, learning to work and play together as equals instead of separately can dissolve the problems of prejudice and nurture the seeds of friendship.

Here are two activities that would promote teamwork and cooperative play among the children in your care:

Example 1: Duck, Duck, Goose Name Game

Everyone is familiar with the “Duck, Duck, Goose!" game, but in this game the child will say the child’s name, followed by the word duck.
For example: “Tristan duck, Petra duck, Ramen duck, Nonie duck,” and so on. With this way of playing the game, everyone helps with the challenge of understanding and remembering names.

Example 2: Snow Ball Fight

With this activity you need to hand out paper and pencils and ask each person to answer several simple introductory questions like these:

-What is your favorite color?

-What season were you born in?

-What sport do you enjoy the most?

- If you were a famous person who would you be?

Now, everyone will crumple up their paper into a ball. When everyone is ready, someone calls out “Snow Ball Fight” and everyone throws paper balls at each other. Now each person takes turns opening a snow ball, reading the answers out loud and trying to guess who wrote the answers.

In our Care Course, Everyone Welcome! , we discuss a variety of ways to help children learn to do things in unison, stay with the group, and follow directions. Want to learn more? Find this course on our website!

Please let us know how we can be of additional assistance! Call us: 1-800-685-7610, Monday through Friday, 9-5 ET, or email us days, evenings and weekends: info@CareCourses.com. We’re here to help!

 

 

 

 

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What's a good activity to encourage communication and cooperation in children?

Posted by Care Courses

Jun 13, 2016 12:00:00 AM

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Looking for a group activity that helps improve cooperative task completion, communication skills, and body awareness? Try “Cooperative Spider Web” from our course “Conflict Resolution in Child Care.”

You will need a ball of string and a large enough area for the children to sit in a circle.  A thicker (heavier) string will work best.

Explain to the children that you are going to make a giant spider web, but that this will only work if everyone does their part.  Have children sit in a circle (close enough together so that the children can roll the ball to one another.)

Start with one child.  Hand them the end of the string and the ball.  They should use one hand to hang onto the end and the other hand to hold the ball.  The child then rolls the ball to another child in the circle, who will also hold onto the string with one hand while rolling the ball with the other.  Continue in this manner. 

You may have to remind the children frequently to hold on, because if everyone doesn’t hold on to the string, the entire web will collapse.  Continued movement of the string will result in a web. 

Please let us know how we can be of additional assistance! Call us: 1-800-685-7610, Monday through Friday, 9-5 ET, or email us days, evenings and weekends: info@CareCourses.com. We’re here to help!

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If You're Happy and You Know It...

Posted by Care Courses

Jun 1, 2016 12:00:00 AM

If you need a fun and engaging activity to do with the whole group of children in your care, try this suggestion from one of our students!


I love to do ‘If You’re Happy and You Know It.’  This works great inside and outdoors.  Keep in mind though that the different activities you do with the song might be different if indoors.  I normally do this with the 1 year olds, but you could do it with the older kids as well.  Simply give them an instruction like ‘If you’re happy and you know it touch your head.’  If you’re outdoors change it to something more physical like ‘If you’re happy and you know it, run.’

If  you try this activity with the children in your care, share your experience in the "comments" section!

Please let us know how we can be of additional assistance! Call us: 1-800-685-7610, Monday through Friday, 9-5 ET, or email us days, evenings and weekends: info@CareCourses.com. We’re here to help!

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When is a child ready to learn how to use the potty?

Posted by Care Courses

May 10, 2016 9:00:00 AM

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Toilet learning is an important milestone in a child’s life, but a child’s transition out of diapers can be a stressful time for parents and childcare providers. And if handled improperly, this transition period can be damaging to the child.

As childcare providers, it’s important to work with parents to provide a supportive environment in which the child feels comfortable and confident.

To help you understand how to foster that environment, Care Courses offers the course, Toilet Learning. The course discusses when toilet learning should begin, how to prepare the child, effective techniques, and tips for collaborating with parents.

Perhaps the most important step in the toilet learning process is determining if the child is ready to begin. If you start too soon the child may not fully grasp the concepts being presented to him or her and it may make for a more stressful process for both childcare providers, parents, and the child.

Toilet learning should begin when the child

  • Can control bladder and bowel muscles
  • Can recognize the need to urinate or defecate
  • Shows an interest in being dry
  • Knows how to manage his or her own clothing in order to sit on the toilet
  • Shows an interest in using a potty seat or toilet and is willing to begin toilet learning
  • Can give a signal to the caregiver or walk to the bathroom unassisted
  • Can sit on a low potty chair or climb a step-stool to a potty seat attached to an adult toilet unassisted

The most important indication that a child is ready to begin toilet learning is the desire to want to learn to use the toilet. If the desire isn’t present, then it is not time to begin because a child should never be pressured, urged, coaxed or bribed to use the toilet.

Once you have determined that a child is ready, that’s when the real work begins! To learn techniques and tips for creating a smooth transition from diaper to toilet, be sure to check out Toilet Learning on our website.

Please let us know how we can be of additional assistance! Call us: 1-800-685-7610, Monday through Friday, 9-5 ET, or email us days, evenings and weekends: info@CareCourses.com. We’re here to help!

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Why is fitness important for young children?

Posted by Care Courses

May 3, 2016 12:00:00 AM

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Caregivers often wonder why fitness is so important in a child’s development. At Care Courses, we offer several courses having to do with the subject. This blog will look at a few concepts from our course, Fun and Fitness: Addressing Childhood Obesity.

The increased rate of childhood obesity in recent years has been found to have a direct correlation to the increased rate of serious medical conditions. These medical conditions include diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, asthma, arthritis, and poor health overall. These conditions are preventable with the proper diet and physical exercise that comes naturally with being an active child.

It is your responsibility as caregivers and teachers to offer children only healthy foods. This means no soda, no fast food, and no heavily processed snacks. Getting the parents involved eating healthy will go a long way to model the proper eating habits.

Physical activities should come naturally to children of all ages. Unfortunately, it’s far too easy to have children watch a movie or television show and play on a phone or computer to keep them occupied.

It your responsibility as a child care provider to ensure that children stay active by providing many opportunities for them to move and be active, both indoors and outdoors, every day.

Infants like to bat or kick dangling objects as well as reaching or crawling toward an object. Roll balls with them or even let them slap a shallow container of water while seated on your lap.

Toddlers can have a bit more structure with their physical activities, such as throwing or kicking a ball and running around. Children of this age also like to dance to music as well.

Preschoolers benefit from several hours of physical activity each day. This also starts to include games such as hopscotch and obstacle paths.

In our course, Fun and Fitness: Addressing Childhood Obesity, we discuss the benefits of physical activity and proper diet and this blog addressed a few. Want to learn more? Find this course and others on our website.

Please let us know how we can be of additional assistance! Call us: 1-800-685-7610, Monday through Friday, 9-5 ET, or email us days, evenings and weekends: info@CareCourses.com. We’re here to help!

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How can you teach children the rules of nonverbal language?

Posted by Care Courses

Apr 8, 2016 1:08:39 PM

 

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Many caregivers want to know how they can help children develop their nonverbal communication. Here at Care Courses we offer a course called Teaching Nonverbal Language Skills, which can help early childhood professionals assess and develop children’s nonverbal communication skills.

Did you know that only seven percent of emotional communication and meaning is actually expressed with words? This is why it is key for caregivers to know how to teach children the rules of nonverbal language.

The first step in assessing children’s nonverbal language development levels is to familiarize yourself with the grammar of nonverbal communication. Nonverbal language is categorized into six areas:

  • Paralanguage (such as tone, intensity, and loudness of voice)
  • Facial expressions
  • Postures and gestures
  • Interpersonal distance (space) and touch
  • Rhythm and time
  • Objectics (personal hygiene, style of dress)

It is also extremely important to let children know what you are doing, especially if there is a deficit in their understanding of social relationships. You will need to exhibit the same amount of patience and support that you show when the child is learning verbal communication.

One way to informally assess the child’s nonverbal language skills is to select a satisfactory TV program showing substantial interactions between children and adults, turn off the sound, and ask the child to tell you what they think is going on as they watch the screen. Be sure to turn up the volume every so often to evaluate the child’s accuracy. Focus on details such as what the characters’ facial expressions indicate and how their facial expressions are used in combination with their postures.

Whether you use the above method or another technique, keep in mind that your evaluation of the child’s nonverbal communication skills should include the child’s ability to:

  • discriminate among nonverbal cues
  • identify the emotions presented in nonverbal communication
  • express emotions through various nonverbal channels
  • apply nonverbal information to interpret what is happening in diverse conversations.

In our Care Course, Teaching Nonverbal Language Skills, we discuss a variety of techniques adults can use to help children improve their nonverbal communication skills. If you’d like to learn more, the course can be found on our website.

Please let us know how we can be of additional assistance! Call us: 1-800-685-7610, Monday through Friday, 9-5 ET, or email us days, evenings and weekends: info@CareCourses.com. We’re here to help!

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Winter Craft Idea for Kids

Posted by Care Courses

Dec 24, 2015 10:54:37 AM

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Looking for a fun wintertime craft to do with the children in your care?  Try this popsicle stick snowflake done by one of our training coaches when she was in preschool!  

You will need:
Four popsicle sticks for each child in your care
White, blue, or grey paint
Glue (both a liquid and a clear glue stick)
Glitter

Prep:
Days before (or the night before) you plan to make the snowflakes, paint the front of the popsicle sticks whichever snowflake color you chose. If you have children in your care who are old enough to handle the painting task, then you can save this step for the day you make the snowflakes. 

What to do:
1. Distribute popsicle sticks to the children.
2. Instruct each child to put a dot of glue in the center of one popsicle stick, and place another on top in a criss-cross shape (like an “x”). Have them hold it there for 15 seconds – keep in mind they’re the “One-Alligator-Two-Alligator-Three-Alligator” seconds. 
3. Next, instruct the child to put a dot of glue on the center of the top popsicle stick. Then, have them place their next popsicle stick in a horizontal line down the center (like this “l”). Have them hold the stick in place for another 15 seconds. 
4. Next, have the child place another glue dot in the center of the top popsicle stick. The last popsicle stick will go across lengthwise (“—“). Have them hold it all together for another 15 seconds.
5. Once everything is glued, have the children brush the visible sticks with the clear glue stick and while the glue is still wet, sprinkle the snowflakes with the glitter. 
6. Allow them to dry completely and write each child’s name and the year on the back of each snowflake.

Please let us know how we can be of additional assistance! Call us: 1-800-685-7610, Monday through Friday, 9-5 ET, or email us days, evenings and weekends: info@CareCourses.com. We’re here to help!

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How can I set up a home day care?

Posted by Care Courses

Nov 13, 2015 3:41:42 PM

Many caregivers wonder how they can set up their own home daycare. At Care Courses we have Caring for Children in your Home, a course that outlines much of what you’ll need to be successful in opening up an in-home child care facility.

A home day care needs to fit the requirements set by the state you live in before you can watch your first child. The person caring for the children to be properly licensed in the state and the daycare areas must be set up according to state specifications. The first step anyone interested in opening up a home daycare will always be to contact your state licensor for rules and regulations.

Organization and careful planning of your daily activities are vital to the success of your in-home child care facility.

During their stay, children will require places to:

  • play
  • eat
  • rest
  • store their belongings

Make sure you are flexible in regards to the age and number of children you may be watching and have appropriate materials for a wide range of situations that may occur while the children are in your care.

Make sure you have a good relationship with parents as well. You need to have plans in place for any circumstance that might arise. These include events such as illness, emergencies, and weather.

In our course, Caring for Children in your Home, we have many more suggestions and examples for how you can be successful in setting up your own home day care. If you’re interested in learning more, you can visit the course information page on our website.

Please let us know how we can be of additional assistance! Call us: 1-800-685-7610, Monday through Friday, 9-5 ET, or email us days, evenings and weekends: info@CareCourses.com. We’re here to help!

 

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About Care Courses

Care Courses has been providing distance learning courses for early childhood professionals for over 27 years. Our courses are delivered to you either via US Mail or on your computer, and can be used for the CDA and many state training requirements. We offer over 60 excellent, convenient courses in a wide variety of interesting, helpful topics, and our courses have no time limits. Do them wherever and whenever you wish. Visit our website to access our course listings.

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